The next script submission period is Monday, July 2, 2012 @12:00 AM to Sunday, July 8, 2012 @11:59 PM ~ How to submit your script ~

Thursday, August 30, 2012

hiatus

The Play of the Week project will be going on hiatus for awhile. When it comes back it will be announced on the NYCPlaywrights web site.

Monday, August 27, 2012

Play of the Week: A LESSON by Emily Cutler



Emily on this play:
This play was inspired by my own struggle with anxiety, which led me to want to give a voice to young adults with Anxiety.  I also believe that it is important to write about the prevalence of drug and alcohol abuse within the young adult community that is often unknown or ignored. At heart, the play is about two sisters and their relationship. I am so excited to have a chance to hear my work and would like to thank NYC Playwrights for this opportunity.
About the author:

Emily Sheera Cutler is a incoming freshman at the University of Pennsylvania who plans to major in creative writing.  Her playwriting experience includes productions at Indian Springs School and the American Repertory Theatre of WNY in Buffalo, New York as well as a staged reading at the University of Montevallo.  She has also been a finalist in the Young Playwrights Inc. National Competition, the Alabama Shakespeare Festival, and the Blank Theatre Young Playwrights Festival.  Her work has been published in Chicken Soup for the Soul: Teens Talk Middle School and literary journals including CICADA Magazine, 5x5 Magazine, Polyphony H.S. Magazine, and The Able Muse Review.  This year, Emily was named a YoungArts finalist in writing as well as a nominee for the 2012 Pushcart Prize. 

About the cast:

Renee Cole is a SAG-AFTRA actress, singer and writer. She is also a world famous Lady Gaga tribute artist, and tours the world with her show “The Lady Gaga Experience.” She has been profiled by The NY Times, CNN, Gawker, Brooklyn Based, India Times, Pop dust, Bitten and Bound, Metro Source and many more.

Renee has performed in The NY Fringe Festival, Midtown International Theatre Festival and has worked in feature films and TV. She has also been the face of several commercial campaigns including X Box 360, and the voice of Playboy.com’s “Bunni Power” cartoon. She is currently developing a web series and cabaret show based on her NYC adventures and blog “There’s A Martini In My Water Bottle”. 

Please visit www.reneecole.com and www.theladygagaexperience.com for more information! 

Larissa Adamczyk was last seen as Alex in the NYCPlaywrights May Play of the Month, Occupy Disney and the monologue Apple Pie. Some of her other roles include: Ulla in The Producers, The Narrator in Joseph, Shelly in Never Norman Rockwell, and the second half of a snarky duo in Don't Mention the "B" Word. She graduated with a B.A. in Dance & English from Rutgers University, and when not joyously performing, can be found teaching musical theatre to kids at Broadway Performing Arts, or eating cupcakes. Larissa's web site.

Sunday, August 26, 2012

Play of the Week: OFF A BRIDGE by Jennifer Skura



Another monologue, this one performed by Eric Percival - a very different character from the one he played in CUTE CHUNKY FEET.

Jennifer says of this monologue:
This piece is the opening monologue for Off A Bridge, my play about a dead gay man who daily must revisit his past in an attempt to save himself from the suicide he committed. This story is inspired my brother, the drag performer ONYA STEREO, LGBTQ teens in need, and my dear friend, activist Jim Swimm, who, with a friend, found Tyler Clementi's body in the Hudson River. As a society, we've become more accepting towards the adult gay lifestyle, however, I believe we have neglected the tremendous bigotry and injustice those same adults have had to endure in order to stand proud today. There are many gay youth out there with nowhere to turn for compassionate and safe gay mentoring and guidance. This is a problem. I'd like my play to be a part of the conversation to finding solutions. Dixon Place will present a staged reading of Off A Bridge on Friday, October 5 at 7:30pm.

About the author

Jennifer Skura is a writer and actor. Her plays include SWEET CITRUS (92nd Street Y), AMARILLO and JOSEPH AND MRS. M (BRIC Arts), PIRATE (Tangent Arts & AboutFACE), STARR adapted from Barry Gifford’s “Room 584, The Starr Hotel” (Open Channel Creations, Monk Parrots & Roger Smith Hotel), OFF A BRIDGE (Dixon Place), EXOTIC ANIMALS, and A MAD WOMAN’S BREAKFAST (D3C). Screenplays include: CITRUS and KINDRED (Cup O’Meat Productions), HIGH PRIVACY (Harmonic Films), and I AM SUICIDE. www.jenniferskura.com

About the actor

Eric Percival has performed on stages throughout the US and Europe.  He was awarded Outstanding Supporting Actor in the 2010 Planet Connections Awards for The Picture of Dorian Grey, and Outstanding Lead Actor in the 2008 MITF Awards for his performance in Bubby's Shadow (Midtown International Theatre Festival).  Other recent NYC performances include leading roles in Hamlet Bound and Unbound (MITF), The Empress of Sex (Planet Connections), Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead (T. Schreiber Studio), Another Horatio Alger Story (Metropolitan Playhouse), Parts of Parts and Stitches (MTWorks), and The Changing Room (T. Schreiber Studio).  Training: London Academy of Music and Dramatic Arts (London), T. Schreiber Studio (NY). Website: www.ericpercival.com.

Wednesday, August 22, 2012

Play of the Week: RAISED RIGHT by MM WIttle





Still catching up on the Play of the Week postings - here is RAISED RIGHT by MM Wittle, performed by Renee Cole. Great work!

MM Wittle says of this monologue:

I was thinking of what would happen if someone got a chance to defend herself to her family. At times, people judge others based on what they see and not what is really happening or looking at the big picture.

About the author
MM Wittle is a professor of writing with an MFA from Rosemont College in Creative Writing. The play, Family Guidance had a reading at the Walnut Street Theatre in Philadelphia, PA and was selected for honorable mentioned at the 5th Annual Philadelphia Theatre Workshop’s Playwriting Competition. The Education of Allie Rose was a finalist in the Philadelphia Ethical Society Playwriting competition and was shortlisted in the Windsor Fringe Kenneth Branagh Award for New Drama in England. MM’s work has appeared in Nailpolish Stories, Transient, The Bond Street Review, and is forthcoming in The Fox Chase Review. For the past seven years, MM has been a fiction board member of the local non-profit literary magazine, Philadelphia Stories and is now a PS Books Poetry and Creative Nonfiction editor.
 About the actor

Renee Cole is a SAG-AFTRA actress, singer and writer. She is also a world famous Lady Gaga tribute artist, and tours the world with her show “The Lady Gaga Experience.” She has been profiled by The NY Times, CNN, Gawker, Brooklyn Based, India Times, Pop dust, Bitten and Bound, Metro Source and many more.

Renee has performed in The NY Fringe Festival, Midtown International Theatre Festival and has worked in feature films and TV. She has also been the face of several commercial campaigns including X Box 360, and the voice of Playboy.com’s “Bunni Power” cartoon. She is currently developing a web series and cabaret show based on her NYC adventures and blog “There’s A Martini In My Water Bottle”. 

Please visit www.reneecole.com and www.theladygagaexperience.com for more information! 

Monday, August 20, 2012

Play of the Week: CUTE CHUNKY FEET by Sarah M. Chichester



The August Play of the Week videos were delayed due to scheduling issues, but here's the first, and others will be posted soon.

Great job by actors Larissa Adamczyk, Eric Percival, Nadege Matteis.

Sarah writes about the play:
This play is very different from what I usually write about, since most of my plays relate to sociopolitical issues. However this piece was inspired by several different true events, one in particular from when I was 21 years old at a food court with a friend. While she was getting food, a guy came up to me saying that I had cute chunky feet.

I wrote this because I like making people laugh and providing them entertainment (along with feeling my pain from the creepiness aspects of it). I hope audiences of many ages (teens and young adults in particular) can enjoy this play, and appreciate that things like this hasn't happened to them.
About the author

Sarah M. Chichester is honored and thrilled to have her original 10 minute play Cute Chunky Feet be selected for the NYCPlaywrights August play of the month! She has a B.A. in Theatre Arts from SUNY Fredonia and is currently an M.A. candidate in Educational Theatre at NYU. Other original short plays and One-Acts include Fetal Attraction, 2026, Accidents Happen, Dreams vs. Realities, and Double Standards.

About the cast

Larissa Adamczyk was last seen as Alex in the NYCPlaywrights May Play of the Month, Occupy Disney and the monologue Apple Pie. Some of her other roles include: Ulla in The Producers, The Narrator in Joseph, Shelly in Never Norman Rockwell, and the second half of a snarky duo in Don't Mention the "B" Word. She graduated with a B.A. in Dance & English from Rutgers University, and when not joyously performing, can be found teaching musical theatre to kids at Broadway Performing Arts, or eating cupcakes. Larissa's web site.

Eric Percival has performed on stages throughout the US and Europe.  He was awarded Outstanding Supporting Actor in the 2010 Planet Connections Awards for The Picture of Dorian Grey, and Outstanding Lead Actor in the 2008 MITF Awards for his performance in Bubby's Shadow (Midtown International Theatre Festival).  Other recent NYC performances include leading roles in Hamlet Bound and Unbound (MITF), The Empress of Sex (Planet Connections), Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead (T. Schreiber Studio), Another Horatio Alger Story (Metropolitan Playhouse), Parts of Parts and Stitches (MTWorks), and The Changing Room (T. Schreiber Studio).  Training: London Academy of Music and Dramatic Arts (London), T. Schreiber Studio (NY). Website: www.ericpercival.com.

Nadege Matteis was admitted to the State University at Purchase Acting B.F.A Conservatory of Theatre Arts program 2012-2016. She has written for a small theatre production entitled Gimme Shelter. Favorite role is “Ismene” in Antigone; favorite play is Nuts by Tom Topor. Her ultimate goal is becoming a fine actor.

Tuesday, July 31, 2012

feedback for P.E. by Doug Williams




Mike Giorgio wants to outlaw dodgeball.

Monday, July 30, 2012

Play of the Week: P.E. by Doug Williams





Tim Lueke appears once again as a teen-ager, although he is in actuality well into his twenties.

Doug Williams on the play:
I wanted to write a play about a dad trying to teach his son how to shake hands. I think it's kind of strange that there is the whole 'you can tell a lot about a person by how they shake hands' mentality and I wanted to let that weirdness play out between and father and son. Then, through writing it, I had more fun focusing on a father's insecurities in his son. Trying to control his son's image, perhaps having gone through a tough time himself when he was his age. 

About the playwright

Douglas Williams is a Silver Award Winner from the National Foundation for Advancement in the Arts. His plays include The Death and Life of Uncle Gene, Shitheads and Now I Am A Wrecking Ball, which is being developed with the support of Wide Eyed Productions. Recent productions of his one-acts have been produced by Nylon Fusion Collective, New York Theatre Experiment, Emerson Theatre Collaborative, and The Stonington Players. He lives in Brooklyn with his girlfriend, Sarah. douglasawilliams.weebly.com

About the cast

Tim Lueke is a graduate of Ball State University. He is most proud of his work with Illinois Shakespeare Festival, The Studio Theatre, and workshop readings of SUNDOGS by Howard Emanuel. Tim loves the opportunity to attack new material and is always on the look out for new opportunities. His thanks to NYCPlaywrights for all the creative possibilities they provide.


Mike Giorgio was a member of 12 Miles West for five years, and appeared in workshops, cafe fests, readings, and radio plays. He last appeared in "The House Around The Corner-A Radio Play." For his other company, The Waterfront Ensemble, he's been Bob in Inappropriate Behavior, The Writer in Fear of Art, Charlie The Adult Film Producer in Technical Difficulties (1998 OOBR Award-Best Production), and Eduardo in The Most Perfect Day (1997 Samuel French One Act Play Festival Winner). He appeared On the Waterfront in Hoboken alongside Vincent Pastore (of The Sopranos) and produced by legendary screenwriter, Budd Shulberg. Other favorite roles include Ned in The Normal Heart, Bobby in Love! Valor! Compasson. He was in the 1992-1993 national tour of Fiddler on the Roof and holds a BFA in Drama from New York University.

Alice Anne English (stage directions) relocated from Washington, DC recently, where she performed with many companies including the Studio Theatre, Forum Theatre, The New Play House, Landless Theatre Company, Venus Theatre, Encore! Richmond Shakespeare on Tour, and in Page-to-Stage events at the Kennedy Center. She now studies with Terry Schreiber at T. Schreiber Studio in New York. Favorite roles include Annie Wilkes in Misery and Gertrude in Hamlet along with roles in new plays.

Wednesday, July 25, 2012

Feedback for Matt Crowley's DRIVEN TO DISTRACTION



Actors Alice Anne English and Tim Lueke discuss video games, family and video games in a post-reading feedback session.

Tuesday, July 24, 2012

Play of the Week: DRIVEN TO DISTRACTION by Matthew Crowley





Matt Crowley on this play:
I love playing games of all sorts. I think most people do--it's fun to be distracted from your work and whatever is on your mind. I was interested in this idea of entertainment, of distraction, and I wanted to explore it further. I hope you enjoy.



Friday, July 20, 2012

August Play of the Week selections

The four selections for the August Play of the Week have been made:
  • A LESSON by Emily Cutler
  • CUTE CHUNKY FEET by Sarah M. Chichester
  • OFF A BRIDGE by Jennifer Skura
  • RAISED RIGHT by Michelle Wittle
The pieces will be video-recorded and posted on the Play of the Week web site throughout the month of August.

Sunday, July 15, 2012

Feedback for 4-16-27



Mike Rehse and Lorenzo Scott in a post-reading feedback of Hal Corley's 4-16-27 reveal all about the world of men's locker rooms, including who covers up and who lets it hang out.

Saturday, July 14, 2012

Play of the Week: 4-16-27 by Hal Corley



The second of the four plays for the July Play of the Week installment.

Tomorrow's post will be a clip of the actors' feedback on the play.

Hal Corley on 4-16-27:
As a 10-year member of a suburban Y, I’ve observed intriguing dynamics amid the rangy demographics of the locker room, impromptu interactions among men who’d otherwise be strangers to one another.  More than once I’ve seen older men unnerved by suddenly forgotten lock combinations, a jolt that invites paralysis and unmitigated terror. The kindness of younger, fitter and sharper strangers can be as threatening as it is reassuring.

Tuesday, July 3, 2012

Feedback for LUCIFER'S BAGGAGE



The cast of the reading of LUCIFER'S BAGGAGE by Mervyn Douglas Kaufman discuss the issues raised in the play and their own naked theatre experiences. With Lorenzo Scott, Alice Anne English, Mike Rehse, and Mike Giorgio, interview conducted and recorded by Nancy McClernan.

Tip for writers - roles for women

Far more male writers than female writers have been submitting work to the July 2012 Play of the Week call for scripts. And while this is unfortunate in itself, compounding the misfortune is the fact that plays written by men tend to have fewer roles - especially substantial roles that are not the typical wife/mother/girlfriend/object of desire supporting roles - for female actors.

So here's a tip - if you want to improve the chances your script will be selected for an installment of Play of the Week, send a play that has one or more good roles for female actors.

If you don't have any plays with good roles for female actors, why don't you try writing one?

NYCPlaywrights wants to be part of the solution, not part of the problem.

For more information on this issue see this article at the Woman and Hollywood web site:

Trouble Brewing on the London Stage: Women Demanding More Roles
A groundswell is brewing in London over the lack of roles for women on the London stage.  It started due to the fact that a bunch of plays recently produced at the Hampstead Theatre, the Globe, the English National Opera, and Chariots of Fire in the West End have all-male or male dominated casts. 
It's striking how this situation in the UK theatre mirrors the issues related to women and film and theatre here in the US.  Each day I become more and more convinced that these are global issues, and that while thing might be a little different here and there, there remains much difficulty for women to still acheive parity all through the arts.
Some people are sick of it and playwright Stella Duffy made a call for women (who buy 70% of theatre tickets) to use their dollars to seek out plays with more of a gender balance:
Theatre, as we learn in Hamlet, is supposed to offer a window on society and yet women are treated as though they are a minority. If we don't tackle this, what hope is there for the female disabled actor, the black woman actor – they have been made a minority twice...We need, as women, to be more circumspect, to seek out plays with female roles – it is not easy, but it is worth doing.
"It is not easy, but is worth doing."  That is an important point.  And one way to make a difference is to look for plays written by women because the statistics show that women writers create more roles for women. 
But there still remains the problem of the fact that there are still too few women writing as playwright Zinnie Harris says:
A female Hamlet may balance the books a bit, and I'm not against it, but a role for women, created about a woman at the centre of a big play, is a really rare thing. The problem has to be partly to do with who is creating the roles.
More at Women and Hollywood

UPDATE: thanks to Stella Duffy for sharing a link to her original article in the comments - the hyperlink didn't work in the comments, so here it is again: http://stelladuffy.wordpress.com/2012/06/27/being-ignored-and-the-suggestion-of-a-monstrous-regime/

My favorite part of the article is where she points out the extreme selectivity in the "historically accurate" trend of all-male casting of Shakespeare plays:
AND – the history thing : look, the ‘historically accurate’ just won’t wash. Historically accurately, you need to perform all your Greeks in one day, outside, full daylight, and as both a competition and a religious ceremony. Historically accurately, you need to have your Shakespearian women played by BOYS, not young men in their 20s, or even less accurately, older men in the 30s and 40s. You also need to do it at the Globe and nowhere else. You also need to make sure only posh people get the seats. And to give your actors their scripts (their parts only) just a week or so before. And again with the weather and the candlelight/limelight and no modern lx/sfx etc. NONE of the ‘historical accuracy’ arguments work. Not one of them. So if the real truth is that you blokes who love making your all-male Shakespeares just don’t want to work with women … perhaps now would be the time to have the courage of your convictions and admit it?

Monday, July 2, 2012

Play of the Week: LUCIFER'S BAGGAGE



This is the first play of the week, selected with three others from the plays submitted in June.

Coming up next: video of the cast - they give feedback about this play and reminisce about their own nude scenes on stage.

Author Mervyn Douglas Kaufman welcomes your feedback about the play too - feel free to share in the comments at the bottom of this post.

Mervyn Kaufman writes about the play...
I was determined to write a play of 10-minute duration, knowing that it could deal with only one issue…and the one that came to mind was art vs. censorship—or at least censorial restriction under the guise of propriety.

I decided to deal with a situation that would be talked about, or hinted out, but not actually shown onstage (although someone who read the play wondered if I should actually have the dancer in question onstage at some point; I said absolutely not).

Then, of course, I wanted the issue to be presented in a balanced way—giving each side the chance to press its argument within the play’s dramatic context and, of course, within the 10-minute time limit I’d set.

“Lucifer’s Baggage” suggested itself when I read of a dance company that had appeared at a Manhattan theater performing one particular dance in the nude. Here, in New York, such a presentation might raise eyebrows in some quarters, but no one would ever suggest suppressing it.  What about elsewhere? I thought.

That’s when I knew I had an idea worth dramatizing.
MORE ABOUT THE PLAYWRIGHT AND CAST BELOW THE FOLD ->

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